Chicken

Tenderness Tips

  • Avoid freezing whenever possible to eliminate additional moisture loss during thawing, which results in less tender meat.
  • Keep chicken from drying out in the refrigerator by keeping it tightly wrapped. If the chicken dries out, it will become tough.
  • Leaving the skin on the chicken, when cooking it, helps to hold in juices, which increases tenderness.
  • To keep breast area of chicken from drying out during roasting, place a piece of foil over this area. Remove during last
    30 minutes of roasting time to allow the skin to brown properly.
  • Cook chicken to the proper temperature, because undercooking the chicken will cause it to be tough and overcooking the chicken causes loss of moisture, making the chicken drier.
  • Let roasted chicken rest for 10 to 15 minutes before carving to allow juices to be distributed throughout the meat. Standing
    the chicken up with bottom end up allows more juices to run into the drier breast area.
  • Cutting meat across the grain will produce slices with shorter fibers, resulting in more tender pieces.
  • When adding cooked chicken to dishes that have a long cooking time, it is best to use dark meat because it will stay moist longer than white meat.

 

Light Tips

  • Roasting chicken on a rack, broiling and grilling are cooking methods that allow fat to drip away from the meat. Poaching, steaming and microwaving are methods of cooking where no additional fat is used. All provide for less fat content in the meat when it is done.
  • When frying or browning chicken in a pan, use a nonstick skillet, which requires less added fat, or use a nonstick skillet with a fat free nonstick cooking spray to reduce the amount of fat used.
  • Reduce added fat by seasoning chicken in marinades that are low-fat or fat-free. Use ingredients such as low-fat yogurt,
    juices, wine, herbs, and spices.
  • Removing the skin before eating chicken eliminates about two thirds of the fat content.
  • When stewing chicken for soup, let broth cool and then discard fat that forms on top before reheating to serve.

 

Cooking Tips

  • When adding chicken to a recipe that calls for a measured amount, determine how much chicken is needed by following a standard of one pound of boneless chicken equals approximately 3 cups of cubed chicken.
  • When roasting a chicken, an untrussed chicken will cook faster and more evenly than a trussed chicken.
  • Covered chicken takes longer to cook in the oven than uncovered chicken.
  • When frying, grilling, broiling, or sautéing chicken, remove pieces as they get done to avoid overcooking while finishing
    other pieces. White meat and smaller pieces, such as breasts and wings, will get done faster than dark meat pieces, such as legs and thighs.
  • For a quick test of doneness when roasting a chicken, hold on to the leg, move it around, and side to side. The leg should move freely at the joint if it is done. Be sure to use other methods for checking doneness also!
  • Do not overcrowd chicken pieces when cooking. Leaving space between them will allow them to brown and cook more
    evenly.
  • If using a marinade for basting, set some marinade aside before placing raw chicken in it to marinate. Never reuse
    marinade that the chicken was marinated in for basting.
  • Be sure to use a sharp knife when cutting or carving chicken. Sharp knives will make the job a lot easier, especially when
    having to cut in the joint areas, and will provide neatly cut slices and pieces.

 

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Goat

There are two general methods used for cooking goat: dry heat and moist heat. In dry heat cooking (grilling, rotisserie, broiling, roasting, sautéing, pan-frying), the goat meat is in direct contact with a hot surface or close to the heat source. High heat is used to quickly brown the surface and any additional cooking is at a somewhat lower temperature. This method works best for tender goat cuts, although tougher goat cuts, which have been tenderized (with a marinade), can be cooked successfully with dry heat. With moist heat methods (braising and stewing), the goat meat is cooked in contact with hot liquid, usually at a low temperature. The hot liquid tenderizes the goat meat and it also acts as a flavoring source. Moist heat methods are usually used on tougher cuts, such as goat shoulder or goat shank because these generally are more flavorful that the popular cuts and simply require a slower cooking method.However moist heat methods may also be used, with care, for tender goat cuts, such as cuts from the goat leg.

Grilling and Broiling Goat

Grilling is a dry heat method that is the most popular cooking technique for goat. The grilling cooking method cooks goat with a high heat source, either directly, indirectly, or with a combination of both. It is essentially the same technique as broiling except that when grilling, the food is cooked above the heat source and with broiling; the food is cooked below the heat source. Because of its natural tenderness, goat is ideal for grilling. Meat for grilling or broiling goat should be tender, fairly lean, and not too thick, since it needs to cook quickly. Goat cuts that are perfect choices for grilling or broiling goat include Butterflied leg of goat, goat chops, goat steaks, goat tenderloin, goat ribs, goat kebabs, ground goat patties, bone-in leg of goat shoulder, and rack of goat and goat loin roast. Other goat legs to be grilled are often Butterflied, to provide a more uniform thickness. A Butterflied leg is a great grill idea for a crowd. When grilling or broiling, thinner cuts of goat can be closer to the heat source than thicker goat cuts because the thicker goat cut will require more time to cook. Goat Steaks and Goat Chops need about 5-6 minutes on each side per inch of thickness. Grill goat at least 4" from moderate heat. If a thicker cut of goat is too close to the heat source, the surface will char before the interior is cooked to the proper degree of doneness. When grilling or boiling, cook goat burgers until medium doneness. In either grilling or broiling, goat meat should be turned when it's half-done, using tongs to avoid puncturing the meat. Brush goat shanks with barbecue sauce and wrap in foil to grill. Marinate goat in the refrigerator. Marinades should be used only once and discarded.

Roasting Goat

Roasting is a dry heat method that may use a small amount of fat or oil as a baste. The goat meat is cooked in an oven or on a rotating spit over a fire, gas flame or electric grill bars. Some goat meat cuts suit high temperature roasting while others are better roasted at low temperatures. Leg of goat is best roasted at low to moderate temperatures. This results in less shrinkage and better serving yields. Goat chops and frenched rack of goat are better rare-roasted at higher temperatures, or first seared then roasted.

  • Slow roast: low temperature, under 325°F (but no less than 212°F)
  • Moderate roasting temperature, 350°F to 375°F
  • Fast roast: high temperature, 400°F or over
  • Sear then roast: brush lean surfaces with oil. Brown goat meat all over in a hot, dry pan then transfer to moderate oven, 350°F, to complete cooking. If possible, take goat meat from refrigerator about 30 minutes before cooking. Sear or brown rack of goat and goat chops first. Pre-searing a roasting goat cut in a hot pan improves colour and flavour, particularly when using small, very lean goat cuts that need only short cooking. Roast on a goat rack. When practical, place goat on a rack to roast. This allows even heat circulation and browning.Netting and trussing. Netting or twine may be used to hold plain or filled leg of goat cuts in an even shape for cooking, portioning and carving. Roasting goat at moderate heat maximizes juiciness and minimizes shrinkage. Goat leg roasts are often cooked this way. Roasting goat at high heat for the entire cooking time maximizes the brown crusty surface, but this method shouldn't be used on large pieces of goat because the surface will dry out and may burn before the interior is done. Resting after roasting. After cooking, before carving or serving goat, allow goat meat to rest, approximately five minutes for every pound of meat. For example: 15 minutes for a 3 pound leg of goat roast. Resting enables temperature to even out, the meat fibres to relax and re-absorb some of the juices. The relaxed goat meat becomes more tender and easier to carve with less loss of juices. An alternative method for roasting goat is to begin with a temperature of 425ºF - 450ºF for an initial 10 - 15 minutes to brown the goat meat and then continue cooking at 325ºF to the desired doneness. To prevent lean goat cuts from drying out while cooking, the goat meat may be rubbed with oil prior to roasting and/or basted with pan juices during roasting. Utilize a meat thermometer to make sure a goat roast has reached a particular stage of doneness. Insert the meat thermometer into the meatiest part of the goat, not into fat or against bone. Although the fat keeps the goat meat moist and tender during the roasting process, it can be trimmed before serving because it is not very flavorful and is actually quite unpleasant after it has cooled. Tougher goat cuts from the goat shoulder should be braised or roasted.

 

Rotisserie Goat

Rotisserie is a dry heat method that is a long slow process, which allows the fat in the goat meat to melt slowly slow cooking process. Cuts of goat that have a basic cylindrical shape and a fairly even distribution of weight are suitable for cooking on a rotisserie. Good choices include leg of goat, rolled goat shoulder, and whole goat. For rotisserie cooking, choose only compact, cylindrical goat roasts for best results.

Sautéing Goat

Sautéing is a dry heat method cooking thin cuts of goat in a small quantity of hot fat in an uncovered pan. Sautéing differs from frying in that less fat is used. It is actually the same process as searing except that sautéing completely cooks the goat meat and searing is simply a means to brown the goat meat so that the cooking process can be completed with another method (usually when cooking thicker goat cuts). Sautéing is a simple and quick cooking method for small goat cuts in a pan containing seasoning, and a small amount of oil, fat or butter. Always preheat your pan. Keep goat medium rare for the most tender moist cut. Goat for sautéing should be tender and not more than an inch thick. When sautéing goat, it is important that the meat surface is dry so that when it is placed into the pan, it browns rather than steams. When sautéing goat, the pan should not be crowded; cook in small batches if necessary. Goat chops and goat liver are good choices for sautéing.

Pan-Frying Goat

Pan-frying is similar to sautéing with a few exceptions: more oil is used; the cuts of goat do not have to be thin; and the cooking process requires more time than sautéing. Pan-frying is a perfect method for cooking small, tender goat such as goat chops, ground goat patties, and goat steaks. The goal of pan-frying is to produce goat meat that has a brown, crispy surface

with tender, juicy, and flavorful goat meat inside. A large, well-seasoned, cast-iron skillet works well or a heavy nonstick pan may be used. The skillet used for pan-frying should have a heavy bottom so that heat will be conducted more easily. Make sure the pan is of adequate size so that there is plenty of room for the goat meat to brown. Following the same basic steps as sautéing, the skillet should be preheated over medium-high heat. Oil is added to the heated pan in a quantity great enough to well coat the pan (less oil is used when sautéing). Like sautéing, high heat is used to sear the goat meat to create a flavorful browned crust. The goat meat should be patted with paper towels to remove excess moisture. Unlike sautéing, the goat can be turned more than once (after the goat meat is seared) because the pieces are larger and require a longer cooking time. Tongs or spatulas are the best instruments to use. Goat blade, arm, or loin goat chops up to an inch thick are good choices for panfrying.

Braising/Stewing Goat

Braising and stewing goat involve the slow cooking of meat in a liquid. This cooking method tenderizes and softens tough goat cuts and allows for rich and subtle blending of the goat meat flavors with those of the liquid and seasonings.

The main differences between braising and stewing goat are:
The size of the goat meat used: Braising requires the use of whole, market ready goat cuts while the stewing process requires that small pieces of goat meat be used.
The quantity of liquid: Braising requires that the level of the liquid be halfway up the side of the goat meat while stewing requires the pieces of goat meat to be totally immersed in the liquid.

Braising Goat

Braising is a moist cooking method where goat cuts are browned and involve the slow cooking of a goat meat in liquid. The technique for braising ready cuts of goat is also known as pot roasting. Braising tenderizes and softens firm or tough goat cuts and allows for rich and subtle blending of the meat flavors with those of the liquid and seasonings. Braising is the perfect cooking method for tougher cuts of goat such as neck slices, goat shoulder cuts, goat riblets, goat shanks, goat flanks, goat breasts and a wide variety of goat dishes. Braising is the preferred method for cooking tougher cuts of goat. Goat cuts that are braised are always cooked until well done because moist heat cooking methods permeate the goat meat with hot liquid and high temperatures, creating tender and flavorful meat. However, braised goat dishes can be overcooked in spite of the moist heat cooking method. Tender cuts from the goat loin and goat rib should always be reserved for dry heat cooking methods.

Stewing Goat

Stewing Goat is a moist cooking method where dishes are often prepared with tougher cuts of goat that have been cut in small pieces. Also, stewing is a technique where small meat pieces are cooked gently in liquid to completely cover the meat and vegetables, if desired. There are many variations of goat stew including recipes that are basically the same as beef stew except that goat is used instead of beef. Other types of goat stew include a variety of goat dishes native to the Mediterranean and Middle East. Many of the same goat cuts that are suitable for braising are ideal as goat stew meat. Stewing tenderizes the goat meat and allows the flavors of the ingredients to blend. When stewing, cuts from the goat shoulder and goat flank are often used as well as other meat from the goat.

Seasonings Suggestions for Goat

Suggest easy marinades for goat such as Italian salad dressing. Goat seasoning favorites include: garlic, oregano, basil, mint, thyme, rosemary, cumin. Lemon pepper and seasoned salt are especially easy seasonings for grilled goat. Insert quartered garlic cloves in goat roasts before cooking. Soak favorite herbs or hickory chips in water and place on coals while grilling goat. Glaze goat with fruit preserves the last 30 minutes of grilling or roasting. Goat works well with oriental sauces including sweet and sour.

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Beef

Summer is the most wonderful time of the year for steak lovers who love to grill. Cut such as the T-bones, ribeyes, New York strips and filet mignon are all time favorites for good reason: all offer a deep beef flavor, a satisfying tender bite and the delicious aroma of meat grilled over a flame.

For beef, there are eight 'primal cuts'. At the top of the animal, starting near the head and going back toward the tail, they are chuck, rib, short loin, sirloin, and round. Underneath the animal, from front to back, they are brisket, plate, and flank. The tenderness or toughness of the cut depends on how much the animal has had to use the muscle. Therefore, cuts near the shoulder or leg, which are used often for movement, are going to be tougher. The muscles that are not used as much, in the center of the animal, include the rib, plate, and loin. These cuts are cooked in different ways to maximize flavor and tenderness. A big problem with describing cuts of meat is that many butchers and grocers have their own names. For instance, a New
York strip steak can also be called a Kansas City steak, Delmonico steak, boneless club steak, and shell steak. If you're unsure about the cut of meat that you're buying, ask the butcher. He or she will be happy to tell you where the cut came from. And as long as the 'primal cut' word is in the name of the cut, you can be pretty sure you know where the meat was located on
the animal.

The Components of Meat

Beef is considered 'red meat' because the animal's muscles need so much oxygen as they work keeping the cow upright and moving it around. Myoglobin is the molecule that transports oxygen around the body; it is red in color, therefore the muscles which are used a lot contain a lot of myoglobin and will be deep red.

Protein, Water, Fat, Sugar, and Collagen

  • When meat is cooked, protein molecules, which are tightly wound and connected to other molecules, first unwind. This is called 'denaturing', and all it means is that the proteins are relaxing and separating. Because proteins are attracted to each other, they almost immediately pair up with other proteins, forming bundles. This is called 'coagulating' or cooking. As
    more heat is applied, the bundles of protein shrink. Up to 120 degrees F, the bundles shrink in width. After 120 degrees F, the bundles begin to shrink in length as well.
  • Water is also present in the muscles. Some of it is bound up with the proteins, fats, and sugars, and some is 'free water'. The amount of liquid left after the beef is cooked is directly related to the juiciness of the finished dish. As the protein bundles shrink and fat melts in the muscle, water molecules are squeezed out. Not too much water is squeezed out as the protein shrinks in width. But as the temperature increases over 120 degrees F and the bundles become shorter, more and more water is squeezed out and evaporated. That's why a well done piece of beef is so dry. Cooking times and temperatures must be controlled when cooking beef.
  • Fat is flavor! A good cut of meat will have specks of white fat evenly distributed through the meat. Leaner cuts of beef, such as flank and round, have less fat and can benefit from marinades and dry rubs.
  • Sugar plays an important role in beef, its finished color and flavor. Sugar and protein, when heated in an acid-free environment, combine to form complex molecules in a process called the Maillard Reaction. The wonderful crisp crust with its rich caramel flavors that form on a seared piece of beef are all from the Maillard Reaction. High heat is required for this reaction to occur; grilling and broiling are the best methods. You can also brown meats before cooking to start the Maillard Reaction, and you can broil roasts at the end of cooking time to achieve the same result.
  • Other substances in meat include collagen and elastin. These are present in the hard working muscles of the animal. Collagen will melt as it is heated, turning into gelatin and becoming soft and melty. Elastin can only be broken down physically, as when you pound a cube steak before cooking or grind meat for hamburger. These compounds are found in the brisket, shank, chuck, and round primal cuts; in other words, the beef we cook as pot roasts.

 

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Lamb

There are two general methods used for cooking lamb: dry heat and moist heat. In dry heat cooking (grilling, rotisserie, broiling, roasting, sautéing, pan-frying), the lamb meat is in direct contact with a hot surface or close to the heat source. High heat is used to quickly brown the surface and any additional cooking is at a somewhat lower temperature. This method works best for tender lamb cuts, although tougher lamb cuts, which have been tenderized (with a marinade), can be cooked successfully with dry heat. With moist heat methods (braising and stewing), the lamb meat is cooked in contact with hot liquid, usually at a low temperature. The hot liquid tenderizes the lamb meat and it also acts as a flavoring source. Moist heat methods are usually used on tougher cuts, such as lamb shoulder or lamb shank because these generally are more flavorful that the popular cuts and simply require a slower cooking method. However moist heat methods may also be used, with care, for tender lamb cuts, such as cuts from the lamb leg.

Grilling and Broiling Lamb

Grilling is a dry heat method that is the most popular cooking technique for lamb. The grilling cooking method cooks lamb with a high heat source, either directly, indirectly, or with a combination of both. It is essentially the same technique as broiling except that when grilling, the food is cooked above the heat source and with broiling; the food is cooked below the heat source. Because of its natural tenderness, lamb is ideal for grilling. Meat for grilling or broiling lamb should be tender, fairly lean, and not too thick, since it needs to cook quickly. Lamb cuts that are perfect choices for grilling or broiling lamb include Butterflied leg of lamb, lamb chops, lamb steaks, lamb tenderloin, lamb ribs, lamb kebabs, ground lamb patties, bone-in leg of lamb shoulder, and rack of lamb and lamb loin roast. Other lamb legs to be grilled are often Butterflied, to provide a more uniform thickness. A Butterflied leg is a great grill idea for a crowd. When grilling or broiling, thinner cuts of lamb can be closer to the heat source than thicker lamb cuts because the thicker lamb cut will require more time to cook. Lamb Steaks and Lamb Chops need about 5-6 minutes on each side per inch of thickness. Grill lamb at least 4" from moderate heat. If a thicker cut of lamb is too close to the heat source, the surface will char before the interior is cooked to the proper degree of doneness. When grilling or boiling, cook lamb burgers until medium doneness. In either grilling or broiling, lamb meat should be turned when it's half-done, using tongs to avoid puncturing the meat. Brush lamb shanks with barbecue sauce and wrap in foil to grill. Marinate lamb in the refrigerator. Marinades should be used only once and discarded.

Roasting Lamb

Roasting is a dry heat method that may use a small amount of fat or oil as a baste. The lamb meat is cooked in an oven or on a rotating spit over a fire, gas flame or electric grill bars. Some lamb meat cuts suit high temperature roasting while others are better roasted at low temperatures. Leg of lamb is best roasted at low to moderate temperatures. This results in less shrinkage and better serving yields. Lamb chops and frenched rack of lamb are better rare-roasted at higher temperatures, or first seared then roasted.
* Slow roast: low temperature, under 325°F (but no less than 212°F)
* Moderate roasting temperature, 350°F to 375°F
* Fast roast: high temperature, 400°F or over
* Sear then roast: brush lean surfaces with oil. Brown lamb meat all over in a hot,
dry pan then transfer to moderate oven, 350°F, to complete cooking If possible, take lamb meat from refrigerator about 30 minutes before cooking. Sear or brown rack of lamb and lamb chops first. Pre-searing a roasting lamb cut in a hot pan improves colour and flavour, particularly when using small, very lean lamb cuts that need only short cooking. Roast on a lamb rack. When practical, place lamb on a rack to roast. This allows even heat circulation and browning. Netting and trussing. Netting or twine may be used to hold plain or filled leg of lamb cuts in an even shape for cooking, portioning and carving. Roasting lamb at moderate heat maximizes juiciness and minimizes shrinkage. Lamb leg roasts are often cooked this way. Roasting lamb at high heat for the entire cooking time maximizes the brown crusty surface, but this method shouldn't be used on large pieces of lamb because the surface will dry out and may burn before the interior is done. Resting after roasting. After cooking, before carving or serving lamb, allow lamb meat to rest, approximately five minutes for every pound of meat. For example: 15 minutes for a 3 pound leg of lamb roast. Resting enables temperature to even out,the meat fibres to relax and re-absorb some of the juices. The relaxed lamb meat becomes more tender and easier to carve with less loss of juices. An alternative method for roasting lamb is to begin with a temperature of 425ºF - 450ºF for an initial 10 - 15 minutes to brown the lamb meat and then continue cooking at 325ºF to the desired doneness. To prevent lean lamb cuts from drying out while cooking, the lamb meat may be rubbed with oil prior to roasting and/or basted with pan juices during roasting. Utilize a meat thermometer to make sure a lamb roast has reached a particular stage of doneness. Insert the meat thermometer into the meatiest part of the lamb, not into fat or against bone. Although the fat keeps the lamb meat moist and tender during the roasting process, it can be trimmed before serving because it is not very flavorful and is actually quite unpleasant after it has cooled. Tougher lamb cuts from the lamb shoulder should be braised or roasted.

Rotisserie Lamb

Rotisserie is a dry heat method that is a long slow process, which allows the fat in the lamb meat to melt slowly slow cooking process. Cuts of lamb that have a basic cylindrical shape and a fairly even distribution of weight are suitable for cooking on a rotisserie. Good choices include leg of lamb, rolled lamb shoulder, and whole lamb. For rotisserie cooking, choose only compact, cylindrical lamb roasts for best results.

Sautéing Lamb

Sautéing is a dry heat method cooking thin cuts of lamb in a small quantity of hot fat in an uncovered pan. Sautéing differs from frying in that less fat is used. It is actually the same process as searing except that sautéing completely cooks the
lamb meat and searing is simply a means to brown the lamb meat so that the cooking process can be completed with another method (usually when cooking thicker lamb cuts). Sautéing is a simple and quick cooking method for small lamb cuts in a pan containing seasoning, and a small amount of oil, fat or butter. Always preheat your pan. Keep lamb medium rare for the most tender moist cut. Lamb for sautéing should be tender and not more than an inch thick. When sautéing lamb, it is important that the meat surface is dry so that when it is placed into the pan, it browns rather than steams. When sautéing lamb, the pan should not be crowded; cook in small batches if necessary. Lamb chops and lamb liver are good choices for sautéing.

Pan-Frying Lamb

Pan-frying is similar to sautéing with a few exceptions: more oil is used; the cuts of lamb do not have to be thin; and the cooking process requires more time than sautéing. Pan-frying is a perfect method for cooking small, tender lamb such as
lamb chops, ground lamb patties, and lamb steaks. The goal of pan-frying is to produce lamb meat that has a brown, crispy surface with tender, juicy, and flavorful lamb meat inside. A large, well-seasoned, cast-iron skillet works well or a heavy nonstick pan may be used. The skillet used for pan-frying should have a heavy bottom so that heat will be conducted more easily. Make sure the pan is of adequate size so that there is plenty of room for the lamb meat to brown. Following the same basic steps as sautéing, the skillet should be preheated over medium-high heat. Oil is added to the heated pan in a quantity great enough to well coat the pan (less oil is used when sautéing). Like sautéing, high heat is used to sear the lamb meat to create a flavorful browned crust. The lamb meat should be patted with paper towels to remove excess moisture. Unlike sautéing, the lamb can be turned more than once (after the lamb meat is seared) because the pieces are larger and require a longer cooking time. Tongs or spatulas are the best instruments to use. Lamb blade, arm, or loin lamb chops up to an inch thick are good choices for panfrying.

Braising/Stewing Lamb

Braising and stewing lamb involve the slow cooking of meat in a liquid. This cooking method tenderizes and softens tough lamb cuts and allows for rich and subtle blending of the lamb meat flavors with those of the liquid and seasonings.
The main differences between braising and stewing lamb are:
The size of the lamb meat used: Braising requires the use of whole, market ready lamb cuts while the stewing process requires that small pieces of lamb meat be
used.
The quantity of liquid: Braising requires that the level of the liquid be halfway up the side of the lamb meat while stewing requires the pieces of lamb meat to be totally immersed in the liquid.

Braising Lamb

Braising is a moist cooking method where lamb cuts are browned and involve the slow cooking of a lamb meat in liquid. The technique for braising ready cuts of lamb is also known as pot roasting. Braising tenderizes and softens firm or tough lamb cuts and allows for rich and subtle blending of the meat flavors with those of the liquid and seasonings. Braising is the perfect cooking method for tougher cuts of lamb such as neck slices, lamb shoulder cuts, lamb riblets, lamb shanks, lamb flanks, lamb breasts and a wide variety of lamb dishes. Braising is the preferred method for cooking tougher cuts of lamb. Lamb cuts that are braised are always cooked until well done because moist heat cooking methods permeate the lamb meat with hot liquid and high temperatures, creating tender and flavorful meat. However, braised lamb dishes can be overcooked in spite of the moist heat cooking method. Tender cuts from the lamb loin and lamb rib should always be reserved for dry heat cooking methods.

Stewing Lamb

Stewing Lamb is a moist cooking method where dishes are often prepared with tougher cuts of lamb that have been cut in small pieces. Also, stewing is a technique where small meat pieces are cooked gently in liquid to completely cover the meat and vegetables, if desired. There are many variations of lamb stew including recipes that are basically the same as beef stew except that lamb is used instead of beef. Other types of lamb stew include a variety of lamb dishes native to the Mediterranean and Middle East. Many of the same lamb cuts that are suitable for braising are ideal as lamb stew meat. Stewing tenderizes the lamb meat and allows the flavors of the ingredients to blend. When stewing, cuts from the lamb shoulder and lamb flank are often used as well as other meat from the lamb.

Seasonings Suggestions for Lamb

Suggest easy marinades for lamb such as Italian salad dressing. Lamb seasoning favorites include: garlic, oregano, basil, mint, thyme, rosemary, cumin. Lemon pepper and seasoned salt are especially easy seasonings for grilled lamb. Insert quartered garlic cloves in lamb roasts before cooking. Soak favorite herbs or hickory chips in water and place on coals while grilling lamb. Glaze lamb with fruit preserves the last 30 minutes of grilling or roasting. Lamb works well with oriental sauces including sweet and sour.

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